Archives for category: advertising

I’ve been told that anyone who works in the ad world should be familiar with Luke Sullivan, the advertising veteran/author/SCAD professor/leader of the resistance against Mr. Whipple.

In all of his spare time, Mr. Sullivan writes a blog. One of his most popular posts asks “What is the truest thing you can say about your product or brand?” He advises agencies to answer that question and run with it.

Now, I don’t know if you know about Kevin Durant, but he’s good at basketball. Some people say “Finals MVP” good, but people also said the Earth was flat, and they were wrong—except for Kyrie who, obviously, can say whatever he wants.

Durant is also a very controversial figure since he sold his soul left the Oklahoma City Thunder to join the Golden State Warriors. ESPN commentators, anyone with a Twitter account, NBA fans, dads across the world; they all have an opinion on this move.

Nike (who, when you think about it, is kind of the Warriors of the athletic gear world) capitalized on Durant’s notoriety with their ad “Debate This,” which ran in the first commercial slot after Game 5 of the Finals when…well, you know.

The ad features a round table of people criticizing Durant for, among other things, being a traitor, for being too soft. They determined he was all-around overrated. But then the Warriors are declared champions and the table goes quiet as the screen flashes to a final card: “Debate this.”

Nike took hold of the narrative and literally silenced the critics. Like Luke advises, they took the truest thing about Kevin Durant this season—his infamy—and shaped their ad around it. It’s bold, but it makes its point.

All that being said: boo Durant, go Cavs.

For the Most Exciting Summer in The Land!

Summer 2016 has quickly come to a close and the sun is setting on my summer internship at Brokaw. As sad as that may be, I have gained invaluable skills in different facets of advertising (and life) that I will never forget. This summer has been FILLED with learning and opportunities that I never even imagined. Before interning at Brokaw, I was intimidated by advertising and having a full-time, fast-paced job as a whole. Now, I can confidently say, pursing a career in advertising is my true passion!

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Whether it was calling RTA partners, interviewing employees at GLBC or creating text for UH Facebook ads, I was constantly busy, but in a good way! I learned how to manage my time between different clients and internal agency work. I also learned as an Account Service intern how valuable the relationship is between the client and agency. Staying organized and on top of tasks for clients is essential to creating great work and building genuine relationships.

What am I going to miss most? The people.

Everyone who works at Brokaw has welcomed Lindsey and I into their huge Brokawesome family. Everyday, I looked forward to working just so I could get to know each team member a little bit better. I LOVED the employee internviews! The internviews allowed Lindsey and I to get to know everyone personally, plus we always ended up laughing at everyone’s silly answers. In their defense, we had very weird questions. I mean who asks, would you rather fight 1 horse-sized duck or 100 duck-sized horses? I made the best memories during those internviews.

I am so thankful that I had this opportunity to discover and deepen my passion of advertising at Brokaw. The internship program is truly one of a kind, as everyone cares so much about the interns! Zorina with her bubbly personality and contagious smile was the best mentor. She always was looking for new assignments so I could gain as much experience as possible in different areas of advertising. Jess Thompson was an awesome partner in crime for the GLBC account, I learned how to build a brand platform and laugh along the way during our GLBC interviews.

Interning at Brokaw has been one of my dreams since I was a freshman in college when Brokaw’s name was brought up during an advising meeting. I studied Brokaw’s work and immediately fell in love with the culture and humor. I dedicated months to creating a Brokawesome application, which was worth every second. When I got an email from Brokaw to set up an interview, I was jumping up and down with happy tears streaming down my face. Looking back, I had no idea how much I would grow personally and professionally.

Thank you, Brokaw for believing in me from the start and helping me excel way beyond my original expectations. Thank you for the most invaluable summer spent building great friendships and challenging myself along the way.

And, hey, I’m not that sad yet because we’re totally going out with a bang for our “Brokrawl” Bar Crawl later today!

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The opening ceremony of the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics is tonight, but advertisements for the 16-day worldwide competition started many months ago. Every brand, especially the sponsors, is striving to make an impact to one of TV’s largest audiences.

The Olympics is very similar to the Super Bowl because advertisers have a huge TV audience, which drives competition for brand exposure with expensive TV spots. The games dominate primetime for 16 consecutive nights, and brands have to be in the Olympics if they want to reach their consumers in the third quarter. However, advertising to a worldwide audience comes at a very high price. For example, NBC has surpassed $1 billion in national advertising including broadcast, cable and digital sales.

The 2012 London Olympics had a reach of 3.6 billion, and the Rio Olympics are expected to draw an even larger audience with cable, live streaming and even virtual reality programming. Now, you can feel like you are at the games with 360° storytelling without buying an expensive plane ticket (or contracting the Zika virus).

Of all the advertisements that are constantly flooding our screens, the Olympics have some of the most passionate, inspiring and powerful ads that I have ever seen. Each athlete has a personal story of failure and triumph that can easily be tied to a brand to make an emotional impact. These messages, whether funny or serious, resonate with us beyond the worldwide competition.

Below are my three favorite advertisements from the 2016 Rio Olympics.

P&G “Thank You Mom”

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This ad is one of the most emotionally relatable commercials that I have ever seen simply because moms are the best. I can’t watch this ad without tearing up because it’s obvious most moms do ANYTHING to help their child achieve their dream. The tagline “It takes someone strong to make someone strong” is powerful and resonates with viewers in a relatable way because moms have been our rock all along.

United “One Journey. Two Teams”

This commercial is more amusing than anything as we all can relate to running through the airport to catch a plane. At least these Olympians make it look graceful while performing their own stunts. I loved how creative the ad was at showing the athletes’ talents to catch a flight in time. The 60-second spot promotes United as the official airline of Team USA for the 2016 Olympics.

Samsung “The Chant”

This commercial hits close to home for me, as I have friends from South Sudan because of my involvement with The Lost Boys of Sudan. They are the kindest people on the planet and they’re finally getting a well-deserved first appearance in the Olympic games. Samsung created a compelling commercial about how much joy the 19-year old runner, Margret Rumat Rumar Hassan, is bringing to the newly independent country. How inspiring is that?

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All in all, it’s an exciting time of the year for sports fans and advertising enthusiasts, like me. I am most looking forward to for the 2016 Olympics are the commercials (and Kyrie Irving, of course, representing The Land all the way in Rio). While everyone else will be fast-forwarding through commercials, I’ll be paying special attention to those that inspire and impact me like the ones above.

Dove, a brand known for their positive portrayal of women, is calling out media outlets for criticizing female athlete’s looks—just in time for the 2016 summer Olympics. The “My Beauty, My Say” campaign hopes to change the media’s focus from appearance to performance arguing, “When they [the media] only see an athlete’s looks, they don’t see her at all.” Dove shares real-time quotes on social media, sportscasts, and magazines by popular media entities like TMZ and Bleacher Report, and offers viewers a chance to respond to these quotes. They range from discussing a female athlete’s “frizzy hair” to saying a female athlete is “built like a fire hydrant.”

 

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Some may believe critiquing athlete’s looks or attire is just part of being in the public eye, but where do we draw the line? Since April 1, 2016 there have been 86.5 million comments about female athlete’s appearance according to http://www.dovehaveyoursay.com. Instead of focusing on their athletic performance, here’s the breakdown of what’s being discussed:

  • Clothes: 11%
  • Body: 26%
  • Age: 6%
  • Beauty: 50%
  • Hair: 7%

When 50% of the discussion surrounding female athletes is solely focused on their appearance, it’s time for a change. A woman’s level of attractiveness or appearance has no bearing on her abilities as an athlete. By focusing on her beauty or body, the media takes away from her hard work and abilities as a professional athlete. Dove put the ball in our court (pun intended), bringing attention to the current offensive approach to women’s athletic coverage, to drive change. It’s time to take the shot: http://www.dovehaveyoursay.com

 

Nothing ruins the message of a well-executed advertisement more than a simple, overlooked typo. Whether it’s last minute deadlines or miscommunication between team members, errors in advertisements constantly happen. For example, Coke makes four times fewer writing mistakes on LinkedIn posts than Pepsi. Now that brands are creating original content on social media and blog channels, proofreading matters more than ever.

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Before my broternship, I never realized the extent to which ads are proofed before they are released to the public. Multiple people from both the client and agency must sign off and approve each advertisement to make sure it meets their standards. Throughout the last few weeks, I have proofed ads for misspellings, punctuation, grammar, sizing, times/dates/locations/names and overall consistency. One unnoticed mistake could have a costly impact for the agency and client. Whether it causes the brand public humiliation or mistrust between the client and agency, it is not a good situation. But good news! It’s completely avoidable by following the correct proofreading procedures that I have learned through the process:

  • Always read a printed version of the ad that you can easily edit
  • Read the text slowly out loud to hear yourself pronounce each word and letter individually
  • Read the copy backwards when looking for spelling errors
  • Double and triple check names, locations, URLs and contact information
  • Ask yourself: does it align with the brand’s standards?
  • Check for grammar, punctuation, consistent verb tense, parallelism, plural vs. singular, homonyms and pronoun/noun agreement
  • Focus your attention on something new each time you read it. First focus on layout, then headings, spelling, grammar, etc.
  • Read something between edits to help clear your head of what you expect to read versus what is actually on the page
  • Reproof every time anything is edited or reprinted
  • Ask questions and always double check yourself if you think you are right or even if you know you are right

Proofreading may seem like a simple, straightforward task, but so much more goes into the process than I ever imagined. Since advertising is the main channel of communication between brands and consumers, it’s essential to get the messages right! All in all, if you follow the tips above, brands and agencies can avoid becoming the laughing stock of the internet like the ads below.

  • First example, Mitt Romney’s attempt to be president through a digital ad for the 2012 election. I mean, doesn’t everyone know you can’t misspell the location of your dream job when applying? America would have thrown out his resume with this one.

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  • This ad luckily doesn’t specify which retailer is selling Creative Kids Software. I’m just glad they’re just selling the educational software and not actually creating it.

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  • Hey Stratford Hall, I think you missed one tiny, little ‘detal’ in this ad about your reliability!

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Come on, you had one job! I hope these ads inspired you of what NOT to do when proofing ads or else you’ll end up as a forever-running joke on the internet. Happy proofing!

Selena Gomez is 24 years old and a single post from this former Disney star is worth more than most people make in a year, two years, three years… A single promoted post from her is worth $550,000, which tops the list of all celebrities – including the Kardashian/Jenner clan. This value is based off D’Marie Group’s algorithm that takes into consideration 56 metrics. These include: followers, post frequency, engagement, post quality, click through and potential to create sales. So although Gomez is not guaranteed to make half a million dollars on every sponsored post, she essentially could use that as a starting point for negotiations.

You’re probably asking yourself, how can a social media post be worth so much money? (Or if you’re me, how can MY posts be worth even 1/100th of that?) There are several factors to Selena Gomez’s monetary value. First, she has 200 million followers on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook who are actively engaging on her accounts. (Not to mention on average, 200,000 more join them every day, increasing the total number of her followers daily.) Brands will pay big bucks to have their product placed in front of that many people – especially if they’re conditioned to engage with the content that typically is pushed out from the page. According to AdWeek, users trust influencers as much as their friends, and around 40% say they have purchased something because they saw an influencer using it. These influencers are seen as real people, and their fans trust them, even if they’re being paid to promote a product. The relationship social media creates between influencers and their followers makes every suggestion feel personal, so if Selena Gomez says to buy a product, her fanbase is likely to do so.

Gomez isn’t involved in many brand partnerships. She’s (or at least her management is) selective about what brands she endorses. Right now that includes Coca-Cola, Pantene, and Kmart. Her feed isn’t diluted with promoted posts. According to D’Marie Group a post by Selena Gomez, or supermodel (and Kardashian) Kendall Jenner, will produce 12x the return on investment compared to standard digital marketing efforts.

Here are a few other top celebrity endorsers on social media:

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Kendall Jenner: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Cara Delevigne: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Taylor Swift: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Gigi Hadid: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Scott Disick: $15,000 – $20,000 per post

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Kim Kardashian: $20,000 per tweet

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Khloe Kardashian: $13,000 per tweet

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Ashley Benson: $5,200 per tweet

Did anyone else die a little inside after that? If you need me, I’ll be working on my Instagram.

As millennials, we’re expected to be the all-knowers of the digital world. We’re on the pulse of social media, and we’re expected to keep up with the downloads and be down with the uploads. It’s pretty crazy – no wonder those Boomers would rather us do it. As tail end millennials and Gen Z-ers are becoming old enough to enter the workforce, it’s easy to see that many of us have difficulties with social etiquette.

For starters, a lot of younger folks struggle with giving away all the information they possibly can share about themselves online. (We’ve all been guilty of it one time or another.) Being comfortable with yourself is a great quality, but it’s important to keep some personal things off the web. My simple test is: Is it something your future employers or grandparents would want to know about you? If the answer is no, don’t tweet about it. I’m glad you’re having a great time on Saturday at 3:17AM, but alerting everyone online that you’re blacked out and can’t find your shirt is not the best call. That’s a story to tell where no one can screenshot it – like in person.

It always makes me laugh when people say “I post what I want, it won’t stop me from getting a job!” I’ve talked to a plethora of employers, and every one of them goes to the fabulous tool we know and love: Google. It takes 2 seconds to type in your name and find out everything about you online. If you don’t have a personal page, odds are your Twitter or Facebook will be the first thing to come up. If it’s not protected, keep it PG-13 – use the employer/grandparents test if you’re not sure. It’s only going to get worse as tech savvy people step into positions of power. No one finds online information faster than millennials with a bone to pick; imagine one as your boss.

So the lesson learned is to be responsible, but that doesn’t mean you have to act like a robot. It’s good to add some personal flair to your social media pages and show people you are a real human. Let people see that you coach basketball in your free time and you love sharing pictures of your dog. Just don’t share everything because “Revealing too much leaves you with nothing.”

Anyone who needs to clean up your social media accounts, here’s a great link: http://www.tweetdelete.net

…you know who you are.

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As some may say, Pokémon Go motivated more American kids to get off the couch in one week than the last seven years of Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign. Even though these kids are glued to their phones, they are actually going outside and walking around! American kids exercising at their own free will – what is happening to the world?  The mobile application has taken over the nation as one of the most viral applications of all time. In fact, the number of active daily users on Pokémon Go has topped Twitter and sees more engagement than Facebook!

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So what is so special about Pokémon Go and how is it surpassing powerful social media tools? Well, the app uses location-based augmented reality to engage users into capturing, training and battling virtual Pokémon that appear in real-world settings. As a player travels throughout the real world, the player’s avatar moves along the game’s map to find Pokémon near the player’s location. Pokémon show up on the player’s screen in real settings where players can capture them with Pokéballs. Sounds fun right? Yes, but warning: it’s highly addictive to “Catch them all.”

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The images above show what the game looks like from the user’s perspective. The far left represents the real-life augmented reality and middle and right screens show the virtual maps.

Since the game uses augmented reality, it is engaging users with the technology of both the real and virtual world of the game in one place. Many establishments have seen a boost in business, especially in walking-accessible cities like NYC and Chicago. Niantic, the company that created the game, wants to offer businesses an even more powerful method of bringing new customers into businesses through Pokémon Go. Soon establishments will be able to become “sponsored” spots in the game that will drive sales and traffic even further. These businesses would pay the company to become locations within the virtual game board with the promise of more foot traffic.

The high engagement level of the game has advertisers interested as a perfect place to target their audience. When locations are sponsored on the game, advertisers could pay per visit, similar to the pay per click on Google’s search ads. The potential for paid advertising that encourage players to visit a business or store is a huge opportunity! More details will be coming soon from Niantic, so keep a look out for new advertising opportunities within the interactive app. Whoever would have thought that Pokémon would become a phenomenon twenty years after the first game on Gameboy was released!

P.S. Plus they show up in funny places too!

The people have spoken and Snapchat has listened. If you’re on social media, you’ve seen the conversation—Snapchat users wishing to rewatch stories and see images past their current disposable nature. The popular messaging app’s newest update will allow for just that. Users can save photos and videos to a newly launched “Memories” page on their app. They can choose to keep images to view later, resend an image or video, and even edit captions.

Snapchat also installed the ability to photo search for simple terms in the images within Memories. If you take a video of your dog, simply type in “dog,” and all those adorable images will pop right up. (If only Apple had that capability…)

Memories will show users data they’ve saved from the past, much like the TimeHop app. Any images users put into their Memories folder will show up on the app on the same date in the future. This “blast from the past” idea has been a well-liked update to Facebook as well. Even better, users can combine their stories to make one long video to share. A lifelong friend’s birthday roast seems like the perfect use for this feature.

Snapchat is consistently improving it’s offerings, giving more incentive for users to stay within their app longer, or for light users like me to get on more often. Snapchat is even growing rapidly among users over age 35. The continued improvements to the application will allow Snapchat to see user growth and soon, Snapchat might be the next Facebook contender. Stay tuned…

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Throughout the past few weeks, I have had the opportunity to contact RTA’s partners about donating event giveaways for the 40+ events RTA is hosting this summer. Most of my communication with these partners has been over the phone, which has been much harder than I originally expected. However, the process has gone smoother as I have gained more experience in how to make these calls personal and beneficial to them.

Below are a few pointers that I have learned along the way (with pet memes inspired by the adorable kittens that visited Brokaw today courtesy of the Cleveland APL):

  1. Write a brief script
    • Have a good idea of why you are calling and what you plan to say. Awkward silence is the WORST over the phone, especially if you have not previously met the person you are calling. Writing a script will make you confident on hitting key points in the conversation. However, do not read directly off your script like a robot. Instead, make your conversation personal just by briefly discussing your notes.

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  1. Call at the right time
    • Avoid calling on a Monday when people are slammed with work or a Friday when they are wrapping up their week. The best time to call is Tuesday through Thursday either early morning or late afternoon.

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  1. Be Confident
    • Attitude is everything when it comes to going out of your comfort zone to call someone that you’ve never met. Your positive (or negative) attitude is easily displayed in your voice and sets the tone for the conversation. Go into each call with a positive mindset by thinking “I can do this!”

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  1. Introduce yourself/explain why calling
    • You’ve got about 10 seconds to prove that you are worth talking to so be quick to introduce yourself and explain why you are calling. Prove to the person on the line that they could benefit from the conversation.

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  1. Always follow up
    • Leave the call on good terms and immediately follow up through email. After calling RTA’s partners about the summer events, I send them specific details about the dates and times so they can discuss the opportunity with their marketing team. This also keeps me fresh in their mind in a written documentation of what we discussed on the call.

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  1. But don’t abuse the relationship
    • Be patient and give each partner time to think over what you talked about on the phone. It may take many attempts for them to make a solid decision or even answer the phone at all. Do not bombard them with emails, phone calls and voicemails. Instead, give them time to consider their options with their team by spacing out your calls
  2. Keep track of your latest activities
    •  Avoid making the mistake of awkwardly calling a partner when you just talked an hour before. Keep track of the latest status of your call with each partner to stay organized on the latest updates.

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Slowly but surely, I have experienced success in not only reaching clients, but also receiving event donations for the RTA. I am no longer intimidated by calling someone I don’t know and asking for their help. I’ve definitely made the right calls by following my helpful tips.