Archives for posts with tag: Branding

 

Nothing ruins the message of a well-executed advertisement more than a simple, overlooked typo. Whether it’s last minute deadlines or miscommunication between team members, errors in advertisements constantly happen. For example, Coke makes four times fewer writing mistakes on LinkedIn posts than Pepsi. Now that brands are creating original content on social media and blog channels, proofreading matters more than ever.

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Before my broternship, I never realized the extent to which ads are proofed before they are released to the public. Multiple people from both the client and agency must sign off and approve each advertisement to make sure it meets their standards. Throughout the last few weeks, I have proofed ads for misspellings, punctuation, grammar, sizing, times/dates/locations/names and overall consistency. One unnoticed mistake could have a costly impact for the agency and client. Whether it causes the brand public humiliation or mistrust between the client and agency, it is not a good situation. But good news! It’s completely avoidable by following the correct proofreading procedures that I have learned through the process:

  • Always read a printed version of the ad that you can easily edit
  • Read the text slowly out loud to hear yourself pronounce each word and letter individually
  • Read the copy backwards when looking for spelling errors
  • Double and triple check names, locations, URLs and contact information
  • Ask yourself: does it align with the brand’s standards?
  • Check for grammar, punctuation, consistent verb tense, parallelism, plural vs. singular, homonyms and pronoun/noun agreement
  • Focus your attention on something new each time you read it. First focus on layout, then headings, spelling, grammar, etc.
  • Read something between edits to help clear your head of what you expect to read versus what is actually on the page
  • Reproof every time anything is edited or reprinted
  • Ask questions and always double check yourself if you think you are right or even if you know you are right

Proofreading may seem like a simple, straightforward task, but so much more goes into the process than I ever imagined. Since advertising is the main channel of communication between brands and consumers, it’s essential to get the messages right! All in all, if you follow the tips above, brands and agencies can avoid becoming the laughing stock of the internet like the ads below.

  • First example, Mitt Romney’s attempt to be president through a digital ad for the 2012 election. I mean, doesn’t everyone know you can’t misspell the location of your dream job when applying? America would have thrown out his resume with this one.

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  • This ad luckily doesn’t specify which retailer is selling Creative Kids Software. I’m just glad they’re just selling the educational software and not actually creating it.

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  • Hey Stratford Hall, I think you missed one tiny, little ‘detal’ in this ad about your reliability!

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Come on, you had one job! I hope these ads inspired you of what NOT to do when proofing ads or else you’ll end up as a forever-running joke on the internet. Happy proofing!

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Selena Gomez is 24 years old and a single post from this former Disney star is worth more than most people make in a year, two years, three years… A single promoted post from her is worth $550,000, which tops the list of all celebrities – including the Kardashian/Jenner clan. This value is based off D’Marie Group’s algorithm that takes into consideration 56 metrics. These include: followers, post frequency, engagement, post quality, click through and potential to create sales. So although Gomez is not guaranteed to make half a million dollars on every sponsored post, she essentially could use that as a starting point for negotiations.

You’re probably asking yourself, how can a social media post be worth so much money? (Or if you’re me, how can MY posts be worth even 1/100th of that?) There are several factors to Selena Gomez’s monetary value. First, she has 200 million followers on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook who are actively engaging on her accounts. (Not to mention on average, 200,000 more join them every day, increasing the total number of her followers daily.) Brands will pay big bucks to have their product placed in front of that many people – especially if they’re conditioned to engage with the content that typically is pushed out from the page. According to AdWeek, users trust influencers as much as their friends, and around 40% say they have purchased something because they saw an influencer using it. These influencers are seen as real people, and their fans trust them, even if they’re being paid to promote a product. The relationship social media creates between influencers and their followers makes every suggestion feel personal, so if Selena Gomez says to buy a product, her fanbase is likely to do so.

Gomez isn’t involved in many brand partnerships. She’s (or at least her management is) selective about what brands she endorses. Right now that includes Coca-Cola, Pantene, and Kmart. Her feed isn’t diluted with promoted posts. According to D’Marie Group a post by Selena Gomez, or supermodel (and Kardashian) Kendall Jenner, will produce 12x the return on investment compared to standard digital marketing efforts.

Here are a few other top celebrity endorsers on social media:

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Kendall Jenner: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Cara Delevigne: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Taylor Swift: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Gigi Hadid: $125,000 – $300,000 per post

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Scott Disick: $15,000 – $20,000 per post

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Kim Kardashian: $20,000 per tweet

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Khloe Kardashian: $13,000 per tweet

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Ashley Benson: $5,200 per tweet

Did anyone else die a little inside after that? If you need me, I’ll be working on my Instagram.

As millennials, we’re expected to be the all-knowers of the digital world. We’re on the pulse of social media, and we’re expected to keep up with the downloads and be down with the uploads. It’s pretty crazy – no wonder those Boomers would rather us do it. As tail end millennials and Gen Z-ers are becoming old enough to enter the workforce, it’s easy to see that many of us have difficulties with social etiquette.

For starters, a lot of younger folks struggle with giving away all the information they possibly can share about themselves online. (We’ve all been guilty of it one time or another.) Being comfortable with yourself is a great quality, but it’s important to keep some personal things off the web. My simple test is: Is it something your future employers or grandparents would want to know about you? If the answer is no, don’t tweet about it. I’m glad you’re having a great time on Saturday at 3:17AM, but alerting everyone online that you’re blacked out and can’t find your shirt is not the best call. That’s a story to tell where no one can screenshot it – like in person.

It always makes me laugh when people say “I post what I want, it won’t stop me from getting a job!” I’ve talked to a plethora of employers, and every one of them goes to the fabulous tool we know and love: Google. It takes 2 seconds to type in your name and find out everything about you online. If you don’t have a personal page, odds are your Twitter or Facebook will be the first thing to come up. If it’s not protected, keep it PG-13 – use the employer/grandparents test if you’re not sure. It’s only going to get worse as tech savvy people step into positions of power. No one finds online information faster than millennials with a bone to pick; imagine one as your boss.

So the lesson learned is to be responsible, but that doesn’t mean you have to act like a robot. It’s good to add some personal flair to your social media pages and show people you are a real human. Let people see that you coach basketball in your free time and you love sharing pictures of your dog. Just don’t share everything because “Revealing too much leaves you with nothing.”

Anyone who needs to clean up your social media accounts, here’s a great link: http://www.tweetdelete.net

…you know who you are.

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As we all know, the Cleveland Cavaliers made history in our city in the thrilling NBA Finals Game 7 coming back from a 3-1 lead by the Golden State Warriors to defeat them 93-89. That night, the 52-year major league championship curse on Cleveland sports reversed as “the block” replaced “the shot,” “the drive” and “the fumble” once and for all. Excitement spread throughout the city and it has been electrifying to see the dedicated fans of Cleveland finally get what they deserve. Of course, social media erupted with videos of the team’s reactions, posts from overjoyed fans and even a congratulations tweet from President Obama.

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The wave was explosive, even if you weren’t a Cleveland sports fan; you wanted to be in that exhilarating moment. Since the unforgettable victory, brands have been trying to ride the wave of congratulating the Cleveland Cavaliers on accomplishing the nearly impossible. At this point, it’s almost overdone by brands now, as I have seen SO MANY posts about how brand X supports the Cavs.

However, one particular brand stands out as a leader in riding the victory wave, especially because they posted their content IMMEDIATELY after the intensity of Game 7 was finally over. Nike released “Worth the Wait,” a powerful new commercial in honor of Cleveland sports fans via Twitter. It’s almost like they knew the Cavs were going to win J. As LeBron and Kyrie are signed to Nike, this move was almost as clutch as Kyrie’s 3-point shot that led the Cavs to the big win.

If you haven’t seen the video, do yourself a huge favor and watch it now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWGgMbcTbFk. In one minute, the video captures the heart and soul of why Cleveland fans are so dedicated to their sports teams and how great it feels to finally be champions. I still get chills seeing the faces of the emotional young and old fans that have waited years upon years to be champions.

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Riding the wave is essential for any brand to make an impact on social media engagement. Here are three ways to do it successfully (just like Nike did with “Worth the Wait”):

  1. Timing: Nike had the best timing by releasing their previously filmed content immediately after the Cavaliers’ title was announced. The result of the NBA Finals was fresh in everyone’s mind and they could easily relate to the commercial.
  2. Relevant Angle: Nike knew their audience perfectly when creating this advertisement. It was relevant, interesting and engaging to watch as a NBA and/or a Cleveland Cavaliers fan.
  3. Social is about people not logos: Nike does not expose its logo until the end of the commercial. The ad focuses on Cleveland sports fans with real human emotion wearing Cavaliers gear and reacting as the Cavaliers make history.

Nike followed these criteria and stood out against other brands that were late to the party (or parade) of congratulating the hardest working team in the NBA. Since the videos release, it has been liked 70 thousand times on Twitter and viewed 2.4 million times on Facebook. Nike successfully rode the victory wave by allowing every viewer to understand how meaningful this championship is to The Land.

 

And I’ll just leave this one here:

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Dollar Shave Club is one of the best examples of a successful brand identity that is ubiquitous, from its packaging to its digital presence.  I’ve always been a huge fan of a beautiful rebrand.  However, what puts Dollar Shave Club (DSC) in a league of its own is that it was already beautiful, even at its start.

The idea alone was simple: solving an a relatable problem that’s shared by men and women everywhere, getting razors that aren’t ridiculously overpriced.  Quality generic alternatives shipped to your door for as little as $3.00 a month is a perfect example of product-market fit.  The founder and CEO, Michael Dubin recognized an age-old need and found a brilliant answer.

You may remember DSC’s head-turning launch video when it came out
in 2012 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUG9qYTJMsI).  That video (now viewed almost 20 million times) spread across the nation like wildfire on social media and made a boring subject like shaving entertaining enough to share with a friend.  But how did such a young and clever brand become the 615 million dollar mogul it is today? Through a delightfully unique customer experience.

When I subscribed to its service, Dollar Shave Club sent me a friendly “welcome to the club” email and shipped a very well-branded box to my door including the following: the products, a playful “member card,” free samples and (my personal favorite) “The Bathroom Minutes,” a hilarious monthly lifestyle newsletter from the chairman with pun-filled quotes, trivia, club news, member spotlights and more.  I loved how humble the packaging was.  The exposed-cardboard box had very little ink on it and yet it had just enough to keep it tastefully stylish.  This only helped represent the brand’s “No BS” core attitude.

This extraordinarily inexpensive and straightforward method of delivery changed the industry.  It seems more and more brands are now mimicking DSC’s approach, probably because of how pleasurable it is to a consumer to (for once) not have a product trying to blind you in the eyes with hologram-y, foil-stamped, 84-color packaging.  No contracts, no hidden fees, a distinct culture and a lifestyle service that’s worth talking about?  That’s not something you witness everyday.

Over 50,000 people a month refer a friend to the club, according to Dubin in a recent interview with CNBC.  That kind of number gets me giddy for advertising.  To be able to elevate your brand high enough that people do the advertising for you?  That’s more efficient and cost-effective than any other brand / media strategy that I can think of…

Stay true,
Dan

It’s no coincidence that a band called The Who wrote a song called “Who are you?” Or maybe it is. We don’t know. But we do know this: your brand identity system—logo design, style guide, brand architecture, etc.—must be ruthlessly carved out of purpose. There should be a reason behind every aspect of your identity. The color. The font. The mark. Otherwise, your audience will be as confused about your brand as we are about classic rock.

—Brokaw, Inc.

What can I say, they understand! One of my favorite things about Brokaw is that the creatives here really have a handle on how to establish a brand. Whether it’s a witty restaurant or a beautiful, historic cemetery, this insanely talented team cuts right through all the blah blah that may cloud a brand’s identity and they transform it into a well-crafted and clear personality that is bound to connect with their target market. They just get it.

As a designer, I have always loved the expert-level sudoku puzzle that is brand identity work. The research it takes to find out hidden bits of information and history, the sketching and transformation of marks, the hunt for the perfect typeface that not only tells a story but also truly speaks to a brand’s personality. It’s one of the reasons I became a designer: I love the challenge.

I’m now in the eighth week of my Broternship and I’ve gotten the amazing opportunity to be a part of the team that takes a client through the identity design process. We’ve researched other business competitors in the area, brainstormed potential names, established what the brand will feel like and provide their customers, and we’re now in the stage of establishing the “look” of the company. It’s so exciting to have my own sketches considered for an actual place that’s actually opening in Cleveland soon!

As I’m designing, I love to look for design inspiration from sites like Pinterest and Behance. Here are a few of my favorite branding suites that I’ve gathered to my collection:


Follow the Rabbit

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Verde

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Honeywood

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My final words on branding:

Great branding isn’t just slapping your logo on a few pieces and calling it a day. Making a system work together well enough to tell the story of a brand is hard work, but if you get it right it’s magical.

Stay beautiful,

Emily